Welcome to the TriLUG home page. We are a LUG dedicated to the Triangle area including Durham, Raleigh, Chapel Hill, and Research Triangle Park. This site, along with our wiki, will enable you to keep abreast of TriLUG information (meetings, events, news), and to communicate with local Linux and FOSS (Free and Open Source) enthusiasts.

The primary modes of interacting with us: mailing list, IRC, or coming to the monthly meetings.

Topic: 
Linux Containers for Learning
Presenter: 
Mark McCahill
When: 
Thursday, 13 August 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Where: 
Bandwidth, Venture III, 900 Main Campus Dr, Raleigh, NC 27606
Parking: 
Venture Center Deck, adjacent to Venture III on Venture Center Way (visitor spaces are unrestricted after 5pm)

Synopsis
Duke University provides access to a wide variety of Linux applications, for student projects, teaching, and research. Besides provisioning hundreds of traditional Linux VM's each semester, Duke is taking advantage of emerging container technologies to host applications.

This presentation will explore a few of the technologies and tools Duke has used for application delivery, including the 350 Ubuntu containers running on Docker that host R and RStudio for statistics courses, and the noVNC/OpenBox solution used to embed X Windows applications in users' Web browsers. (Source code for some of this technology will be available on GitHub.) It will also discuss more generally the strategy and the tradeoffs involved in providing virtualized applications - especially when you have to give sudo access to students.

Bio
Mark McCahill works at Duke University's Office of Information Technology, as an architect for e-learning and collaborative systems. He was involved in the development and popularization of early Internet technologies - most notably at the University of Minnesota, where he led the team that developed Gopher. He is also interested in virtual worlds, developing the GopherVR system for organizing Gopher information spatially, and serving as an architect of the Croquet project.

Topic: 
Free Software and Copyright
When: 
Thursday, 9 July 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Where: 
Bandwidth, Venture III, 900 Main Campus Dr, Raleigh, NC 27606
Parking: 
Venture Center Deck, adjacent to Venture III on Venture Center Way

Synopsis
Free and open source software owes its existence to copyright laws, but as the community has grown, understanding of copyright and licensing has diminished. Source code hosting sites are now replete with improperly licensed projects, license violations, and users and developers who are unclear what rights they actually have. But it doesn't have to be this way!

This presentation will open with a crash course on copyright, and then narrow its focus to issues related to Free Software licensing -- how the licenses actually work, how to choose a license appropriate for your project, where trademarks and patents fit into all this, and what licensing things you should NEVER EVER DO. We'll close with a look at the Supreme Court's recent decision in Oracle v. Google and its implications for free software.

Bio
Matthew Frazier is TriLUG's PR Officer and a recent graduate of NC State University's Computer Science program. At NC State, he developed and taught the Digital Millennium Copyright Class, a one-hour seminar course on modern copyright issues. He enjoys participating in the free/open source software community by presenting and teaching at conferences and user groups. (And sometimes he even writes code.)

June 18 Workshop and Hack Night


Topic: Workshop on Open-source Phones and TriLUG Infrastructure
When: Thursday, 18th June 2015, 7pm - 9pm
Where: Splat Space; 800 N Mangum St, Durham, NC 27701; and #trilug-sys on freenode
Parking: See http://splatspace.org/location/
Map: Google Maps

(Also showing on the Splat Space Meetup page.)

Work on a personal project, hone your skills, or try something you learned about at a recent meeting. While you're at it, help us maintain the TriLUG infrastructure.

Maybe you can bring an old phone down and see if CyanogenMod or another free OS can be flashed onto it, or play around with other free software available on your phone.

This month we continue tweaking our offsite backups, take the first steps down the path to the next incarnation of our infrastructure, and set up a group infrastructure git repository. Come on down and dig in!

Topic: 
Meeting 11 June: Open Source Your Phone!
Presenter: 
Randy Barlow
When: 
Thursday, 11 June 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Where: 
NC State Engineering Building II Room 1021, Centennial Campus, Raleigh, NC
Parking: 
The parking decks and Oval Drive street parking are free after 5pm

Synopsis
Freedom and convenience are often at odds, especially in the modern world of cloud computing and mobile devices. This talk will present the speaker's journey from using a largely closed source, closed protocol mobile platform to a much more free and open mobile operating system. Due to the relationship between mobile and cloud computing, a significant portion of the journey involved choosing free software for the server side as well. Many challenges were faced along the way! This talk will discuss the various free client and server software components that were necessary to protect the speaker's privacy and freedom, while maintaining a comparable level of service to that which was enjoyed before. A few alternatives to these choices will also be discussed, and during the Q+A session suggestions for competing software will be welcomed.

Bio
Randy Barlow is a software engineer at Red Hat, Inc. He currently works on the Pulp Project, a component of Red Hat Satellite 6 that performs software repository management. He has been working with Python since 2006 and has also worked with C++, Java, and PHP prior to that. His experience includes scientific computing, natural language processing, systems management, and web development. He is a Linux geek and loves free software.

Video: https://youtu.be/es6xBRhtaN8
Slides: http://trilug.org/~rpbarlow/open_source_your_phone.odp

May 14 Meeting: How to Give a Tech Talk


Topic: How to Give a Tech Talk
Presenters: Brian Gerard, Daniel Farrell, Jason Hibbets, Sandi Metz, Chris Collins
When: Thursday, 14th May, 7pm (pizza from 6.45pm)
Where: NC State Engineering Building 2 Room 1021, Centennial Campus
Parking: The parking decks and Oval Drive street parking are free after 5pm
Map: Google Maps
Video: Youtube

Synopsis:
Giving a tech talk can seem daunting. Come get some tips and tricks from folks who have done it before.

This presentation will be a panel discussion about how to give a technical presentation. Panelists Brian Gerard, Daniel Farrell, Jason Hibbets, Sandi Metz, and Chris Collins will join us to talk about how they prepare to give a presentation, what to do and avoid during a presentation, how they handle questions from the crowd, and other aspects of presenting.

Bios:

Brian Gerard has been working with various *nixes, and Linux specifically, since the mid-'90s, as a Systems Administrator, a Software Engineer, and an end user. After eight years developing abuse defenses for Yahoo! and training their engineers, he now uses his expertise doing deployment automation and security work for WebAssign.

Daniel Farrell is a Software Engineer on Red Hat’s SDN Team, where he contributes to upstream OpenDaylight and OPNFV. He has been involved in SDN’s development since it emerged from Stanford, including early OpenFlow and OpenStack work. He’s now an active committer on OpenDaylight’s Integration Team.

Jason Hibbets is a senior community evangelist in Corporate Marketing at Red Hat where he is a community manager for Opensource.com. He has been with Red Hat since 2003 and is the author of The foundation for an open source city. Prior roles include senior marketing specialist, project manager, Red Hat Knowledgebase maintainer, and support engineer.

Sandi Metz, author of "Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby", believes in simple code and straightforward explanations. She prefers working software, practical solutions and lengthy bicycle trips (not necessarily in that order) and consults and teaches and speaks on all
things OOP.

Chris Collins began working for Duke in 2006, and became a systems administrator with the Duke Office of Information Technology's Linux team in 2008. As a technical lead and tech enthusiast, he teaches introductory and intermediate courses and workshops to a wide variety of audiences around campus, and regularly gives presentations highlighting new projects and technologies.

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